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20130218
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of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my kno
the panel board that only supplies the receptacles that you're going to be using for the computer or sensitive equipment is one answer. you want to make sure that you install that circuit, the wires are remote from any radio frequency devices or any other circuits that might impose a radio frequency on them. >> what kind of wires would impose a radio frequency? >> it could be a computer, another computer, it could be the microwave oven. >> you want to separate is from any other -- >> ideally. if you're running your wires in a raceway or an armored cable that uses ferrous metal, that protects those conductors against these radio frequencies much better than nonmetallic cable. that would be another strategy. and then if you're in a commercial installation where it is really, really important, you put in isolation transformers adjacent to the equipment. that's the most expensive solution but the best solution is to actually put an isolation device right at your equipment. they also have filters that you can buy, but that's a commercial-grade installation. residentially, a dedicated c
. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-r
people talk about globaltion people are local and jobs are local. each of us each day can fix the neighborhood. real progress is credit place specific and - this concreteness is one of the benefits of college track. it lift up one student after another it looks after and supports individuals. it stands or falls on the local individual concrete attention. there is nothing global about it's on the difference even though we believe that other institutions like ours with help the world. slowly we partially we build out. we're great deal of that mayor lee has chosen to make his first state of the city address here. it sends a message for all student in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here a
as many long term investments as we used to. >> how do you define a long-term investment? >> good question. so, i think the question is, how speculative is this? i will use us as an example. we have a team in this building working on lithium batteries. their goal is to build a battery with 500 miles of range, for obvious reasons. we hope they will have a prototype in the feet next few years. we think -- in the next few years. we think the stars are lined up. that is a long-term investment. >> next question to all of you. michael, we will start with you. we know government is the regional -- at the regional, state, and local level can help or hinder startup companies. what would you like to see from the governments here in the valley, sacramento, or in d.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing called agil
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
significantly. i used to get two calls a week of people complaining about the bylaw, i don't get any of it now because we're able to defuse it by telling them about the support programs. i've been talking all afternoon. we also offer two mural programs, one that we fund ourselves directly and one that we offer community groups $2,000 to paint murals in the community. the idea is that that program is a matching program so community groups can match up to $2,000 with any type of community effort so they can get an artist to donate the art work, you can get somebody to donate paint, their volunteer hours count against the matching, so all of that is helpful in terms of getting them going. and what we really found is that some groups will use the two thousand and spend 12,000 on doing a mural. the best one i've seen, we had a high school do two dugouts that were constantly being hit, it cost them $750 and we have no problem with the dugouts any more. public awareness, we have a very, very substantial public awareness campaign. we have media support from all of our local radio, television and
from one of the resident artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when
friends who are dear to us will be kneer to us once more ♪through the years, we all will be together. >> hang a shining star on top of the highest bow. ♪ ♪have yourself a merry little christmas now. ♪ ♪ ♪have yourself a merry little christmas. let your hearts be light ♪ ♪from now on, our troubles will be out, out of sight ♪ ♪have yourself, a merry little christmas. make the yule tide gay. from now on our troubles will be miles, miles away. ♪here we are as in olden days, happy golden days of yore. happy friends who are dear to us gather near to us once more. ♪ >> through the years, we all will be together ♪if the fates allow. ♪until then we will have to muddle through somehow. and have yourself... a merry little christmas now. ♪ >> thank you. [ applause ] >> thank you. >> i am in the holiday spirit now, aren't you? let's hear it for tammy hall and veronica klaus. >> i got jealous for a minute there, some of the members of the san francisco boys chorus are getting more pictures than i am. as you look around this room, think about the events that you have bee
of enlightenment. he was guiding us away from the dark time known as the disco era. [ laughter] who knew that chris would work his timeless style for the next 34 years. look at the effect on me, who is wearing the button-down now that. was the first life lesson from chris. stick with the classics, they won't go out of style. that said, my wife has gently advised me the definition of a classic look does not extend to certain flannel shirts from 1982. our next topic on the less sons that we learned from chris back then involve culture. this is beyond the stereotypical fraternity life experience, because i was lucky enough to live with chris and another famous piedmonter austin tichner. talk about enlightening. he dubbed our large room the triple occupancy club. little did i know this came with the added bonus of an extracurricular education in the arts. chris arrived with his stack of lps, many courtesy of his step dad, bob. the chronicle music critic at the time. austin contributed his eclectic theater and comedy recordings and, well, himself. those of you that know austin know that nothing more ne
>>> my name is chris stevens, i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. i had the honor to serve as the envoy to the libyan revolution and i was thrilled to watch the libyan people stand up and demand their rights. now i'm excited to return to libya to continue the great work we've started, building a solid partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. si
the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people
. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how many of you have
in the city and congratulations to the foundation for your wonderful work congratulations to all of us nobody has got it better than us in san francisco congratulations everyone. (applause) . i don't ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage grace davis, director of california corporate affairs intell corporation ... >>> okay with today being valentine's day we are thrilled to help present 13 new heart art works we see these hearts all around san francisco, reminding us that the general is the heart of our city these hearts generate we have a remarkable roster of artist and is this year is no exception and please join me in welcoming to the stage this year's heart artist and in 2013, heart artists are linda at vino. chai davis ... (applause) tara g i f ra,, wendy gold hearts of letters ... natalie guy command are hearts natalie is not able to join us today. brick hoard heart of the giants. >> and which has been defined by the members of the 2012 championship scenes. >> -that is okay we can have another applause. robert night english heart 2.. >> mary an doors yes, i amia on
us do what we do is special thank to supervisor camp poe and is his assistants for always being there for us and i know the mayor left but if there is anything in this room that can get they two minutes of his time, i know i can get this city to be a safer place for awful us. with the help of my partner. and then in closing i'll like to say there is a lot of beautiful hearts here and there were some big ones on the way in and none of them came as whole with the love that i have for my if girlfriend. plast. >> that was short. i thought i was going to stand there for an hour. first i would just like to thank every everyone for their support and this idea that has become so much more with their help and captains col rails and most zero and our sergeant and supervisor kayser camp poe and is his staff and micro, my family, who's here today, my dad, thank you for everything. (applause) out on the street we face many different challenges in law enforcement i truly enjoy working until the city of san francisco that i was born in and somebody once said absorb what is useful dis
assemble, make sure you have, at least one person has something here that you guys can all use. different types of buildings are in the city. we have wood, unreinforced masonry, you have high rise and you have tilt ups. what's the safest construction type to be? four stories or less. wood? yeah, wood framed building. why is wood the safest building to be in, 4 stories or less? it flexes, yeah, it's flexible. what's the danger here? chimney, yeah, fireplace. be aware of the fact that just because it's a wood building and the event caused some sort of compromise of the structure of the building and the building is still standing doesn't necessarily mean there's not a danger there. so what could you as nert's do to make that situation better or at least keep it the same so no one else gets hurt? keep it off, yeah. keep people away. perfect. take out some of that yellow tape that you have, that yellow caution tape, and string it around around keep people back. in this particular case, what could you do to make that situation better? turn off the gas. where would you turn the gas off at? at th
of a garden tour and a lot of us thought, a garden tour? our neighborhood? who is going to come? well, we had every -- we've done it for six years. every year we've grown incrementally. after the first two years of raising money for the library -- there's our new library -- we then it was such a great community builder that we recently decided to keep wanting to volunteering and do it. we established a scholarship at city college for the horticultural department. and we have just gone gangbusters. we get good press and we get to see everybody's neighbor -- all our neighbors' gardens. because of the way san francisco s you get to be veuyer because usually you have to go through their garage or their house to see the gardens. and ruth gets known through the neighborhood because she's constantly peeking over fences and leaving fliers in people's mailboxes saying, do you want to be on the garden tour, and all this sort of thing. but anyway, so, we've -- just to show you how much the neighborhood has gotten to know each other, all the people in the portola, wave your hand. [cheering and applauding
's bayview, that's potrero hill, visitacion valley, it's a little hollywood, it's dogpatch. it used to be the portola, half of it. my heart is still with you, but i'm glad like the speaker said, it is whole. and that is what's important, is that that neighborhood remains whole so that our city will be whole. you agree? [cheering and applauding] cheers >> so, a few years back there was this little idea to take back the bayview and really began to rewrite the history and the narrative that we often hear about in bayview. and it actually started, ironically, with a small little abandoned swath of land that has grown up to become the cuseda garden. and it's the thought child and the physical manifestation of hard work, of a few community leaders that got together and rolled up their sleeves and got to work. and tonight i have the honor to introduce one of the co-founders, his name is jeffery betcher. where are you? get up here. and jeff is going to introduce to you as he escorts ms. annette young smith to the stage. this lady, ladies and gentlemen, is a lifetime achievement award winner
for grace cathedral for welcoming us andel rio tonight will be tans adancing all night long and what better place to rise than at san francisco's beautiful city hall and to celebrate van tine's day on the steps with mayor lee and president chiu and all of the elect of the officials and leaders and jewelery and all of woman in ant violence leader whore here and add are doing this work everyday along side all of you need i thank san francisco for riding san francisco is a very special place to be. as executive director i now live here it's a very special place and she send her love today from the congo. i just spoke to her today before we came on. i want to personally thank every single person in the mayor's office in the d a's office in the department of commission of status of woman, every single agency that works on this issue everyday from the bottom of my heart, and eve sends her love and thank you as well you have made made this rising happen and every single unof you have and on that node, i would like to welcome mayor lee. thank you. (applause) . all right how are you all doing?
the waterfront the mixed use development with the san francisco giants at c-3 lot will create vibrant new neighborhoods. and in less than 5 years we'll workman's compensation the golden state wares. a crumpling appear for parked cars will be transformed into a new arena bringing people closer to the waterfront and creating good jobs and year-round jobs. it will a be a short walk along the waterfront. leakage those kinds of opportunities attacking on a mba france should i say and privately finance and building a new facility on your water front only come once in a lifetime. we have a obligation to always put our people first and we must have the best opportunity for building all the facilities we need. i think that we have looerdz who are attentive to the neighbors and the public. well this is a partisanship that's meant to last. i look forward to doing this right. and sees this extraordinary opportunity. and as you can see our opportunity is not just think building it's about the international events we attract. and children and old will see a wonderful water space. last week many of us
all are at the heart of the this place the idea we call san francisco. you know, many of us came here from smoip else or their parents did. and whether it was guadalajara or a rural county in texas what brought us here was that hope where in san francisco as most places offered a better life. it was judged by a play we create not by a language we grew up with. we're a city that rewards the inno matter and the risktaker. fred and harvey ye very and willie brown and nancycy pelosi. we've known our share of adversity, earthquake and the problems with aids. we're not afraid to fail or doing what we know is right. and most importantly we know that none of us succeed alone whether it's in reconcile or business or life. we know as michelle obama said so well, this past summer when you walk through that door of opportunity you don't slam it shut you help someone else walk through that door behind you. my fellow san franciscans i know there's no limit to the opportunities in this city in we keep the door open. if we commit ourselves and put politics behind us we can help future generations and
and want us to continue to acted indicate violence here in san francisco and start a global movement. (applause) everyone here is touched by domestic violence. if you say you do know, it may be your co worker it could be your sister who doesn't want to speak out it could be your mother or grand mother. i do this in memory of a fellow co worker a fellow public sector attorney laura sweat who was murdered by her husband and in that moment, two young children were left without a mother. i do this in her memory and in hope that her children will no longer see anymore violence and i do this in the hope that the world will see no more violence. thank you for joining one billion rising. you have the power to save lives. (applause) thank you julie sue the president of the commission and the status of woman. are there vagina's around? yeah are there pussies here? , my name is medical knee mand har and i'm the president of the fill phenowoman's network one of the organizers of these events tonight. and i'm a survivor of domestic violence i i'm here ton because when i was 22 -years-old
of these events visit us at s f gvment gov tv dot ordinary care an@@to the fift awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community lead
you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only 3% of all the water that we deliver. and when you think about
. but we have a word we use, professional. we try to be professional around people that have suffered a loss like this because they don't want us to come -- you don't want to go into somebody's house and be joking and having a good time. it's unprofessional. when you are dealing with somebody who has a loss like this, just think of the word professional. that's what we try to do. this sort of body language here, she's trying to comfort here, do you think she's buying it? not with that body language. she's not really buying it. some people won't. some people will never be the same. like that thing with katrina, some people are really good but you can tell just under the surface that they are a wreck. give them space, try to be professional, try to comfort them if you can, but some people won't let you. and don't take it personal. that's the main thing, just don't take it personal. sometimes people just can't be helped. they are not mad at you, they don't hate you, you are trying to help them. they probably understand that, but they have suffered a terrific loss and some people you can'
. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should
washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it's good rule to live by. hepatitis a and sal min nillia and geria
canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue doing, is that you have to remember others that are less fortunate, and share our hearts and our minds and our resources with them. and it is just like japan, for what they have done. if you read the papers recently, you know, that japan suffered a very harsh earthquake and tsunami a while back. and they could have easily said, that we are victims of a national disaster. but, when the country heard that the debris was crossing international lines, all the way to the west coast, and they did not claim victim.
graffiti is out there, we can now go to the arts council or anybody else who wants to argue with us and say 90 percent of the observed graffiti we have in edmonton is text only. given all those options, that's what we're finding. so the other avenue that's important for us in terms of how i run my program is when i'm trying to promote a mural program or i'm trying to promote community support programs, it's really important for me to basically say that you can't cut the community portion of my program because 71 percent of the observed graffiti is on private property. only 10 percent of our graffiti in those neighborhoods was observed, was on city infrastructure. other government considered 19 percent and of that 97 percent was on canada post boxes like they are the drop boxes that the mail carriers use for picking up their mail to deliver. they are being phased out, though, so again within the next year or so, those boxes are going to be phased out in edmonton so we'll see if it makes a change in graffiti results. but it also assists us in terms of how we approach them. so we take th
be of huge use to you. meetings, we hold a monthly task force meeting and our task force meeting pretty much covers everything from santa barbara down to san diego is our main group we have a task force meeting with. we share ideas, it's evolved over the years, become more formal. now each time we have a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer
city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th cent
, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the
going to use my chance just to ask one last question. do you believe that you have marked fashion history? >> it is difficult to say. is it my purpose? i do not know. i think that's everybody is marking fashion history in a way. as much as journalists because they show the people. what is fashion history? some old clothes that you can find may be in the free-market? books, magazines, newspapers? i think that i am part of that, but to think that me, i'm mark -- i do not think so. it is not exactly my purpose. it really seems very selfish to do what you love. >> i'm glad i managed more or less to silence you with my question. [laughter] i would like to say that i believe you have marked fashion history in the best way by creating clothes, which have been a mirror to society as it changed and as it happened, and you will be known for that as much as for the beauty of the close. thank you so much for giving us the chance to talk to you. [applause]
, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this girl which is different. does not know how to walk as a model. they have their own personality. i remember this year i was asking a professional model to walk to see if there wer
want to thank you all for joining us today and i also want to especially thank the owners. that is terrific. what a shop you have. thanks, david, appreciate it. excellent. and hope you join us again on thursday with "building san francisco."
for us and she won the contest for designing the logo for the conference. pretty nice design, i think. so, monica rose will be receiving an award for the designing of the logo. she designed the programs and she designed the brochures to promote the conference. and she's already said that she's on board donating it for the 2013 conference in phoenix. (applause) >> >> rick stanton nominated somebody. rick? * >> if you've been working in graffiti profession for awhile, i think everybody knows randy campbell. who knows randy campbell? that's good. those of you who don't, especially if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a netwo
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